Category Archives: Abandonment

Autonomy: the Basis of Respect and Dignity Standard

“Be a good girl and take your medicine.” Part 1 This statement was made to a 60 year old end stage leukemia patient who demanded to be discharged from the hospital. The patient refused the prescribed medications.  No attempt was made to discuss the risks attendant in not taking the prescribed medication. The patient was cogent and articulate – able to make medical decisions for herself. The physician walked out of the patient’s room in the ICU. No social worker, bioethicist had been called to assist. Patient Jane was merely told, “Be a good girl and take your medicine.” What…

Red Flag Rules and the Practice of Medicine Standard

Red Flags Rules require financial institutions and businesses that give credit to consumers to establish some sort of program or procedure to identify customers who may be involved in identity theft. Since most medical providers provide medical services and allow the patient to pay their bill at a later time, and in concert with insurance benefits, the FTC intends to treat medical practice as a “creditor” and thus come within the scope of Red Flag rules. “Creditor” is defined by this law as any business or organization that defers payments for goods or services.”     On May 21, 2010…

Life, for some in Texas, is Cheap Standard

HEALTH AND SAFETY CODE CHAPTER 166.039. PROCEDURE WHEN PERSON HAS NOT EXECUTED OR ISSUED A DIRECTIVE AND IS INCOMPETENT OR INCAPABLE OF COMMUNICATION For the most vulnerable patients, without friends or family, life for some medical patients in Texas, is cheap.  On vague and specious grounds and without proper oversight or transparency, physicians may withdraw life sustaining treatment from a patient, even if the patient is conscious, talking, and aware of his or her surroundings. This statute allows this to occur if a physician treating the patient concludes that the patient will die within six months and there is no…

Autonomy and Abandonment – Legal and Moral Implications Standard

Advance Health Directive: Patient has an advanced health directive, witnessed, notarized and in the format of a legal document done by his attorney, rejecting treatment if he has a terminal condition with the probability of death within a few months; and/or an irreversible condition requiring artificial life support. Patient’s daughter is designated as surrogate. The document is notarized. This 84 year old man is admitted for pneumonia; dementia; depression; anemia; malnutrition; renal failure, and hypernaturemia. History: Dysphasia, anorexia, ataxia, poor intake, altered level of consciousness, restless, hypotensive, shortness of breath, bilateral rales. He is unable to give any history himself….